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Wearable Thermoelectric Generators Powered by Body Heat

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SEMINAR

  The State Key Lab of

  High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure

  Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  中 国 科 学 院 上 海 硅 酸 盐 研 究 所 高 性 能 陶 瓷 和 超 微 结 构 国 家 重 点 实 验 室

  Wearable Thermoelectric Generators Powered by Body Heat

  Daryoosh Vashaee

  North Carolina State University, USA

  时间:2017年7月20日(星期四)9:30

  地点:2号楼600会议室(国家重点实验室)

  欢迎广大科研人员和研究生参与讨论!

  联系人:史 迅(2803)

  Abstract:

  Thermoelectric Generators (TEG) can be used to harness the body heat and steadily generate electricity to power wearable or implantable health, sport, or environmental monitoring sensors. Hence, they can play a key role in future healthcare and recreational electronic devices. The NSF sponsored Engineering Research Center, Advanced Self-powered Systems of Integrated Systems and Technology (ASSIST), at North Carolina State University develops and employs nanotechnology enabled energy harvesters and sensors to create battery-free, body-powered, and wearable health monitoring systems. After a brief introduction of the ongoing efforts in ASSIST, we will discuss the prospect of TEGs for powering wearable technologies. In particular, recent advances in nanocomposite thermoelectric materials for body heat harvesting, flexible TEGs, and device optimization strategies for wearable applications will be discussed in detail. Such devices can be implemented into the healthcare systems and become available for public use.

  Introduction:

  Daryoosh Vashaee is an Associate Professor at North Carolina State University Electrical & Computer Engineering Department with courtesy appointment at Materials Science & Engineering Department. He received his PhD working under supervision of Dr. Ali Shakouri at University of California at Santa Cruz in 2004, worked at MIT as postdoctoral scholar under supervision of Drs. Mildred Dresselhaus and Gang Chen, and worked at Oklahoma State University as Assistant Professor in 2008-2013. He is an expert in superlattices and nanostructured materials for energy conversion and sensing applications. In the past, he has contributed to the development of several key thermoelectric structures including heterostructure thermionic devices and bulk nanocomposite thermoelectric materials. He is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award and the Goldsmid Award for research excellence in thermoelectrics from the International Thermoelectric Society.

 
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