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Implication and Application of Direct Cellular Reprogramming

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SEMINAR

Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Research Center, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

中国科学院上海硅酸盐研究所生物材料与组织工程研究中心

Implication and Application of Direct Cellular Reprogramming

Speaker:Prof. Kam W Leong

(Columbia University)

报告时间:2016年7月18日(星期一)下午3:00

报告地点:4号楼14楼第二会议室

联系人:常江(52412804)

欢迎广大科研人员和研究生参加!

Abstract:

Direct cell reprogramming, where differentiated cells are reprogrammed into another lineage without going through an intermediate stem cell-like stage, produces cells promising for regenerative medicine. It obviates the use of embryos and minimizes the risk of teratoma formation associated with the use of induced pluripotent stem cells. Direct reprogramming can also produce cells for disease modeling and drug screening. I will discuss our recent effort to convert human endothelial progenitors (hEPC) into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC), hEPC into induced skeletal myocytes (iSkM), and human fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iSML). I will describe various approaches of achieving direct cell reprogramming using transcription factor overexpression, microRNA delivery, molecular pathway manipulation, and CRISPR/dCas9-based transactivation either separately or in combination.

Personal information:

Kam W. Leong is the Samuel Y. Sheng Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia University. He received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. After serving as a faculty in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for almost 20 years, he moved to Duke University in 2006 to focus on understanding and exploiting the interactions of cells with nanostructures for therapeutic applications. After moving to Columbia University in September 2014, he continues to work on nanoparticle-mediated nonviral gene delivery and immunotherapy, from design and synthesis of new carriers to applications for hemophilia and infectious diseases. The lab also works on the application of nanostructured biomaterials for regenerative medicine, particularly on understanding cell-topography interactions and on the application of nonviral vectors for direct cellular reprogramming. He has published ~300 peer-reviewed research manuscripts with citations exceeding 31,000 and a h-index of 93, and holds more than 50 issued patents. His work has been recognized by a Young Investigator Research Achievement Award of the Controlled Release Society, Distinguished Scientist Award of the International Journal of Nanomedicine, and Clemson Award for Applied Research of the Society for Biomaterials. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Biomaterials, a member of the National Academy of Inventors, and a member of the USA National Academy of Engineering.

 
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